Category Archives: Lake Stewards of Maine

Lake Stewards of Maine’s 2021 Annual Newsletter Now Online

Lake Stewards of Maine’s 50th Anniversary newsletter, The Water Column is now available online. There is lots of interesting reading in this 48 page Issue, something for everyone. I particularly liked “Seven Ways To Monitor and Document the Effects of Climate Change on Your Lake” by Scott Williams, on page 9, and “BloomWatch: Harnessing the Power of Citizen Science Through Collaborative Monitoring of Cyanobacteria Blooms” by Tristan Taber, on page 15. I also really enjoyed “A Day in the Life of an IPPer” by Debbie Broderick from Lake Arrowhead. With a little luck we’ll be getting started with our own Invasive Plant Patrol program here on Clary Lake this year. The Clary Lake Association has been a participating member in the Lake Stewards of Maine’s Maine Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program since 1975 making Clary Lake the 3rd longest monitored lake in the state. Currently, our volunteer lake monitors are George Fergusson and Kelsie French and we try to collect data every 2 weeks during the boating season- typically from sometime in April until late October or early November.

Here’s a link to the newsletter. Enjoy!

25 April 2021: Diminishing ice cover on Maine’s lakes could impact fish populations

Lake Auburn. This picture links to the article.

Here on Clary Lake we haven’t been keeping ice in and ice out records for long enough to see a shortening of the iced-in period. Our records go back to 2001 and in that time, there’s no obvious trend but over significantly longer periods (many decades and longer) it’s clear that Maine winters are gradually becoming milder and anyone who’s lived around here for more than a few years can testify to that fact. This article in the Kennebec Journal discusses some of the impacts of shorter iced-in periods on Maine Lakes.

Lake Stewards of Maine 2021 Winter Newsletter Is Out

Lake Stewards of Maine (formerly Maine Volunteer Water Monitoring Program) has mailed their Winter 2021 newsletter, The Water Column. Print copies are in the mail and should arrive any day. As usual, they’ve produced a great publication. I especially liked the articles on “Influences of Extreme Weather on Maine Lakes in 2020” (on page 16) and Late Season Algae “Flash Blooms” in Lakes” (on page 26), both by LSM Executive Director Scott Williams. Also, the article “Changes to Communication & Technology in
the Past Few Years and the Spurs of CoViD-19″ by Tristan Taber was quite interesting. Continue reading

Lake Stewards of Maine’s Summer Webinar Series

The Lake Stewards of Maine (formerly Maine Volunteer Lake Monitor Program) is putting on a series of weekly webinars on various topics of interest to people involved with Maine Lakes. This notice is from an email I just received. I’ve attended 2 webinars so far, the first on Climate Change and it’s Impact on Maine Lakes and most recently, a program on Metaphyton. Highly recommend taking in some of these programs if you can find the time. Head over to their website to see what’s being offered. I’ll try to publicize future webinars here.


Please Join Us for our Summer Webinar Series:
   
  
In lieu of our Annual Lake Monitoring Conference, Lake Stewards of Maine – Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program will be hosting a series of weekly informational webinars from June through August on a wide range of topics pertaining to Maine Lakes. The sessions will be approximately one hour in length, and will include an opportunity for Q&A for those who attend the live webinars on the posted calendar date. Pre-registration is required for all who plan to attend. The webinars are open to Maine’s citizen lake scientists, as well as the general public.

 

The live webinars will take place at 4PM on Friday afternoons, beginning on June 5, and will go through August 28, with the exception of the holiday weekend of July 3.  All sessions will be recorded, and made available for future viewing on our website.
 
The Next webinar looks quite interesting:
 
Citizen Stewards and Maine Lakes:
Collaborative Approaches for Sustainable Systems
 
Presented by Firooza Pavri, PhD; airing this Friday, June 26 at 4pm
 
Freshwater resources provide vital societal and ecosystem services.  Keeping our lakes and ponds healthy for future generations will require that we strive to gain a more nuanced understanding of the complex factors that influence their well-being.  Historically, models aimed at identifying which Maine lakes may be most vulnerable to ecosystem decline have rarely considered the role that private citizens may play in the process.  However, local citizen stewardship efforts such as water quality and invasive plant monitoring, watershed surveys, and other citizen-driven conservation and management efforts can be a major factor in determining the long-term resilience of an aquatic ecosystem.  In this webinar, Dr. Pavri will share her recent research looking at the important role that citizen lake scientists and other lake residents play in protecting Maine waters for the future, and how we can use this information to more clearly determine lake vulnerability.

Lake Stewards of Maine Informational Webinars

I will post updates as new webinars are announced.


Please Join Us for our Summer Webinar Series:
 
  
  
In lieu of our Annual Lake Monitoring Conference, Lake Stewards of Maine – Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program will be hosting a series of weekly informational webinars from June through August on a wide range of topics pertaining to Maine Lakes. The sessions will be approximately one hour in length, and will include an opportunity for Q&A for those who attend the live webinars on the posted calendar date. Pre-registration is required for all who plan to attend. The webinars are open to Maine’s citizen lake scientists, as well as the general public.

 

The live webinars will take place at 4PM on Friday afternoons, beginning on June 5, and will go through August 28, with the exception of the holiday weekend of July 3.  All sessions will be recorded, and made available for future viewing on our website.
 
The complete season of webinar topics and speakers will be announced soon. Information on our first webinar presentation is listed below:

 

The Crown Jewel Lakes of Central Maine, and the Threats They Face
 
Presented by Matt Scott and Lloyd Irland; airing Friday, June 5 at 4pm
 

 

Maine is fortunate to have some of the clearest and cleanest lakes in the nation, several thousand of which are in public domain. However, all our lakes are vulnerable in varying degrees to a growing number of anthropogenic-based threats. We are part of the problem, and we have the ability to be the solution, as well. Matt Scott and Lloyd Irland share their experience and perspective on where we are, how we got here, and what can be done to ensure that our lakes will remain healthy for the enjoyment of future generations.

 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
 
Matt Scott is the founding father of Maine’s “Lakes Program”. He was the first biologist hired through Maine DEP in the early 1970’s, at which time he established a lake-focused research and protection unit that soon gained widespread recognition and respect. Matt was the driving force behind the formation of the first statewide citizen lake monitoring program, which continues to this day as Lake Stewards of Maine (formerly Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program). He currently lives in Belgrade.
 
Lloyd Irland has served in Maine state and local government, as a consultant, and is an author writing on a range of topics concerning Maine’s natural resources. He has recently advanced the research regarding changes in the phenology of ice cover on Maine lakes. Lloyd is currently writing a book on Maine’s wildland rivers, and lives on a tributary to Androscoggin Lake in Wayne.
 
Lindsay Papa will be a senior at Colby College next year, and is currently a summer intern with Lloyd Irland. She has assembled much of the data used in this presentation.
___________________________________________
 
Our next webinar will be:
 
The Influence of A Warming Climate on Aquatic Invaders in Maine Lakes
 
Presented by Roberta Hill, LSM Invasive Aquatic Species Director
and Aquatic Ecologist; airing Friday, June 12 at 4pm
  
Maine lakes have historically been protected to some degree by a relatively cool climate. Many species of invasive flora and fauna that have successfully infested lakes throughout much of the US have failed to gain a foothold in Maine, in part due to our long, cold winters, and cool water temperatures. Our warming climate is changing this. Roberta Hill will provide an overview of the effects of climate change upon Maine lakes, and discuss the implications for Maine’s native lake communities.
 
 
Roberta is an aquatic ecologist and environmental educator. She has been active in the field of lake protection and community outreach in Maine for thirty years and has been instrumental in the creation and development of some of Maine’s most successful and long-standing lake education programs. Currently the Invasive Species Program Director for Lake Stewards of Maine, Roberta is the originator and coordinator of LSM’s internationally recognized Invasive Plant Patrol (IPP) program, through which close to 5,000 individuals (volunteers, professionals, agency personnel, students, teachers and others) have been trained to screen Maine waterbodies for the presence of invasive aquatic plants. Roberta is the principal author of the Maine Field Guide to Invasive Aquatic Plants and co-author of Citizens’ Guide to Invasive Aquatic Plant Management.
_____________________________

 

Thank you, and we hope you can join us for Fridays at 4 for Lakes!

 

LAKE STEWARDS OF MAINE
24 Maple Hill Road     Auburn, ME  04210
(207) 783-7733 |  stewards@lakestewardsme.org

03 April 2020: Clary Lake is Featured Lake on Lakes of Maine Website

Lake Stewards of Maine maintains several great websites including the Lakes of Maine site which provides detailed technical information about most lakes in Maine, including Clary Lake. They also feature a different Maine lake on their website every month including a picture and a brief write up about the lake. April’s Lake-of-the-Month is Clary Lake! The picture they’re using for Clary Lake was taken by David Hodsdon. Another cool site maintained by Lake Stewards of Maine is the Near Real Time Lake Data site.

 

02 January 2020: The Winter 2019 Water Column Issue Is Out

The Winter 2019 Lake Stewards of Maine’s periodical “The Water Column” arrived in our mailbox today. As usual, it’s full of interesting information about the state of lake water quality monitoring in Maine, invasive plant problems around the State, and other issues impacting lakes in Maine.

Last year’s Winter 2018-2019 issue of The Water Column was all about the impact of climate change on Maine lakes, and this winter’s issue continues their coverage of climate change with an interesting article on ice-in and ice-out trends. The Lake Stewards of Maine does a great job of publicizing their activities. The Clary Lake Association has been conducting water quality monitoring on Clary Lake in association with the Lake Stewards of Maine (formerly the Volunteer Lake Monitor Program or VLMP) since 1975 and is a long time supporting member of their organization.

https://www.lakestewardsofmaine.org/mediaresources/the-water-column/

Here’s a link to the full document:

The Water Column Winter 2019

18 September 2019: Maine Public Radio Program on Algal Blooms

Scott Williams of Lake Stewards of Maine

There is a new Maine Public program on algal blooms and climate change that is well worth watching (or listening to). Here on Clary we have avoided a severe algal bloom this season though we’ve seen them in the past; we did have a mild, short-lived bloom back in early July, no doubt brought on by a spike in phosphorus levels due to heavy rainfall and the resulting runoff in April, May, and June. While Phosphorus levels have remained high this summer, transparency has remained greater than 3 meters all season. We’ve been fortunate. We are most at risk however in September and October as the lake water “turns over” mixing phosphorus at the bottom of the lake into the upper layers of water where it can feed blue-green algae.